Mobile Learning and Education

Volume 3       Issue 1       January 2018

Growth of Mobile Technologies

According to the latest International Telecommunications Union (ITU) data there are still substantial differences in levels of ownership of mobile devices and access to broadband internet between the developing and the developing world. However, it is promising to note that there is a steady growth in the ownership of mobile devices and especially mobile phones across the developing world. This growth in mobile technology adoption has brought much hope for improving the livelihoods of the most disadvantaged. Education is seen as one such domain and mobile learning in particular as an instance of the application of mobile technologies to achieve improved life conditions.

Mobile Technologies in Education

Notwithstanding the rapid growth in ownership of mobile technologies and the promotion of mobile learning as a new model for delivering education, many challenges remain and need to be addressed before we can truly achieve ubiquitous and impactful education via mobile learning. Recent studies suggest that while there is an increase in the adoption of mobile technologies in higher education many problems related to their effectiveness and usage remain [1] such as mobile learning infrastructure, institutional support and design problems related to the pedagogy and content suitable for mobile delivery [2]. These challenges require systematic exploration and this is particularly important in the developing world where the stakes are higher because of resource challenges.

Mobile Learning: Research Agenda for Developing Countries

There is a tendency in the developing world to adopt technologies, practices and models from the developed contexts without due consideration to the local contexts. Our research on mobile learning in Guyana and the Caribbean more widely acknowledged at the outset potential differences and the possible effects these may have on adoption.

Our ongoing research on mobile learning has thus far been two-fold. We are working towards developing a better overview of the level of adoption of mobile technologies in formal learning at the University level in Guyana [2] and across the Caribbean [3]. Our data so far has shown mobile phones technologies are the most widely adopted for learning, that ownership of other types of mobile devices is linked to income; and that students more than lecturers are likely to explore various features on their devices for learning [2]. While we noted an increasing trend in the use of mobile technologies, it is important to understand the factors that might hinder or promote the acceptance and adoption of these technologies in our context. To this end we have assessed a number of technology acceptance models [2] [3] with the aim of determining how well these models work in our context and to help us identify the factors that may or may not be holding up. We found that the attitude towards the use of the mobile technologies for learning is the most important driver of adoption in the Guyanese context. Further, factors may vary across the developing countries context.

Next Steps

We aim to explore two aspects of mobile learning in the near future; one focus will be methodological and the other focuses on mobile computational learning. Our aim is to establish whether these categories can explain the adoption of mobile learning and mobile learning technologies. Second, our work on mobile learning will take a different turn and will explore how mobile technologies can assist the learning of computing. We will undertake a project to bring computing to students at the primary and secondary schools level using the BBC’s Micro:bit technology. This small technology fits the description of the mobile agenda and will allow us to take technology to various schools and groups not constrained by classroom settings. This view of mobile learning will allow us to reach a wider cross section of society using a small resource base.

References

[1] Pimmer, C., Mateescu, M., & Gröhbiel, U. (2016). Mobile and ubiquitous learning in higher education settings. A systematic review of empirical studies. Computers in Human Behavior, 63, 490-501.

[2] Singh, L., Thomas, T.D., Gaffar, K., & Renville, D. (2016). Mobile Learning in the Developing World: Perceptions Using the UTAUT Model. In Handbook of Research on Mobile Devices and Applications in Higher Education Settings. Eds Briz-Ponce, L., Juanes-Mendez, J.A., & Garcia-Penalvo, F.J.

[3] Thomas, T.D., Singh, L., Gaffar, K., Thakur, D., Jackman, G.A., Thomas, M., Gajraj, R., Allen, C., Tooma, K. (2014). Measurement invariance of the UTAUT constructs in the Caribbean. International Journal of Education and Development using Information and Communication Technology (IJEDICT), 10(4), 102-127.

 

IFIP WG 9.4 2018 European Regional Conference on the Social Implications of Computers in Developing Countries

Call for Papers

2018 IFIP WG 9.4 European Regional Conference on the Social Implications of Computers in Developing Countries

Organised by IFIP WG 9.4, the UNESCO Chair in ICT4D at Royal Holloway University of London and the European University of Tirana.

22nd to 24th June 2018, Tirana, Albania

Key Dates

Abstract Submission Deadline: 20 March 2018

Acceptance Notification: 10 April 2018

Early Bird Registration Deadline: 30 April 2018

Camera-ready Version Due: 20 May 2018

Venue: Hotel Tirana International, Tirana, Albania

Theme: Digital Innovation for Sustainable Development

Information technologies in general are great drivers of change that can create opportunities for new and improved models of sustainable international development. Digital innovation, when adapted to specific needs, could have the ability to solve social challenges, but concerns about amplifying inequality, access to benefits and diverting resources away from more pressing development priorities remain.

We are particularly interested in submissions related to innovation agility, indigenous innovation in developing countries and digital innovation for sustainable development. However, we are soliciting submissions across the full range of topics of interest to IFIP Working Group 9.4 in the broad areas of technology and sustainable international development, focusing but not limited to the following areas:

  1. Digital innovations for poverty and inequality reduction
  2. Technology-enhanced education
  3. Equality and human rights
  4. Digital technologies and forced international migration
  5. Technology, automation and decent work
  6. International business and economic growth
  7. Sustainable and innovative cities and communities
  8. Responsible consumption and production
  9. Digital governance, peace and justice
  10. ICT4D in South-East Europe

Extended abstract submissions for research papers (2 pages long excluding references) or work-in-progress abstract submissions (1 page long excluding references) should be submitted by the 20th of March 2018. They will be peer-reviewed and collated into an eBook which will be published online with an ISBN.

The aim of the Regional Conference is to provide an engaging space for researchers and practitioners to share their work and participate in a number of additional workshops around the following areas:

  • Working in multidisciplinary research projects
  • Getting published in leading international journals
  • Impacting policy and practice

Call for Submissions

We seek proposals for panel or workshop sessions (1 page long excluding references) on topical issues bridging across multidisciplinary theory and practice, and professional development training workshop sessions on research impact, methods, fieldwork or publishing.

We are also seeking extended abstract submissions for research papers (2 pages long excluding references) for presentation at the conference.

Work-in-progress abstract submissions (1 page long excluding references) can be submitted for presentation as posters or demo installations. They will be displayed at the conference.

Submissions

Abstracts, panel and workshop proposals should be sent in in PDF format, by email to ifip94euro2018@gmail.com

Submissions should follow the formatting guidelines for the IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology (IFIP AICT). Submissions should include: Title, Author names, Address, Email/URL, Keywords, the main body of the extended abstract and references, if required. It is not necessary to include an abstract section in the extended abstract. A submission template is available HERE, and detailed information is available from:

http://www.springer.com/gb/computer-science/lncs/conference-proceedings-guidelines

Registration fees

Early bird

Before 30 Apr 2018

EUROS

Full price

From 1 May 2018

EUROS

Academics and professionals: Developed countries 290 330
Academics and professionals: Developing countries* 200 230
PhD students: Developed countries** 150 170
PhD students: Developing countries*,** 100 120
Distance participation: All*** 50 60
Gala dinner 40 50

These fees include a discount of at least 10% for participants from all IFIP member societies. Online payment for the registration fee using debit or credit card will become available in the beginning of April.

*Developing countries are considered those in the OECD DAC List of ODA Recipients: http://www.oecd.org/dac/stats/daclist.htm Participants from developing countries can apply for a bursary by sending a cover letter along with their submission. Decision will be made based on merit and need.

** PhD Students willing to volunteer for facilitating the event can apply for a bursary by sending a cover letter along with their submission. Decision will be made based on merit and need. Priority will be given to local PhD students.

*** Online participation is for those who want to submit an extended abstract, but who cannot participate in person in the conference. The will have a chance to interact with the participants at the session when their presentation is scheduled and their contribution will be included in the proceedings.

 Accommodation, Visa and Transfers

The conference will be hosted at Hotel Tirana International located in the Main Square of Tirana, combining a truly strategic location and breath-taking view of the capital city.

Any visitor who holds a valid, multiple entry and previously used visa issued by a Schengen area country, United States, or the United Kingdom, or a residence permit in these countries can enter Albania without a visa for 90 days.

Tirana International Airport Mother Teresa is about 30 min drive from the hotel.

Call for Participation and Bursaries

We plan to offer a number of bursaries to attract Graduate Students from universities in developing countries in Europe or outside, researching on topics of interest for the conference that may have difficulty obtaining support from their host institution to attend the conference.

Bursaries will be allocated on a merit and need basis. If you wish to apply for a bursary, with your submission, please include a cover letter (1 page) demonstrating your need for financial support.

Conference Committee

Conference Chair:          Endrit Kromidha, Royal Holloway, University of London

Programme Co-Chairs:

Kozeta Sevrani, University of Tirana

Tim Unwin, Royal Holloway University of London

Agim Kasaj, European University of Tirana

Programme Committee

Jyoti Choudrie University of Hertfordshire, UK
Betim Cico South East European University, Macedonia
Jose-Rodrigo Cordoba-Pachon Royal Holloway, University of London, UK
Robert Davison City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Gentian Elezi Agenda Institute, Albania
Neki Frasheri Polytechnic University of Tirana, Albania
G Hari Harindranath Royal Holloway, University of London, UK
Richard Heeks University of Manchester, UK
Ravishankar Mayasandra-Nagaraja Loughborough University, UK
Irena Malolli National Agency of Information Society, Albania
Silvia Masiero Loughborough University, UK
Petter Neilsen University of Oslo, Norway
Devinder Thapa University of Agder, Norway